Akamoji-kei vs Aomoji-kei: It all started with red letters
In my last post, introduced Aomoji and Akamoji to you. I gave a basic definition and went deeper to explore the currently popular Aomoji-kei subculture. This time, I’ll be focusing on Akamoji which has not be properly covered in my opinion. I hope by reading this, it will expand everyone’s knowledge on Japanese fashion.

Akamoji-kei (literally: Red-letter style) is a fashion subculture that is more accepted by the mainstream. Akamoji appeals to young office ladies (OL) and female college students and is characterized by its conservative style. It is often worn by women in their early 20s. It is a style that is thought to be popular with men. Despite being conservative, it’s far from being outdated and is considered elegant. The name akamoji comes from the five magazines which were first known for their red title on the cover page. However it can be said that it has been on a decline since the bubble economy burst. Nowadays it has somewhat mixed with gyaru, creating onee-kei.
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Akamoji-kei vs Aomoji-kei: The rise of Harajuku

Today, I wanted to introduce the concept of Akamoji-kei and Aomoji-kei. Now you may ask, what the heck is that? It is a concept that not many people outside of Japan know of. Based on research and my own understanding, I hope to give you a greater understanding these concepts. This is a two-part piece so I’ll be doing the currently popular Aomoji-kei.

Aomoji-kei (literally: Blue-letter style) is a fashion subculture that is influenced by the trends in Harajuku. It is a casual yet girl fashion. However it also prides itself as being radical and creative. It is opposite to the conservative and elegant akamoji kei. As such, it appeals to women rather than men. The term was coined by Asobi System’s Yusuke Nakagawa. Rather than Shibuya which influences the notorious gyaru-kei, Aomoji-kei sticks close to Harajuku. The differences in the reader models can be seen between the two styles. Gyaru models tend to brimming with energy and always show a smiling face. While Aomoji-kei models tend to show off their duck lips and look expressionless.

So in simpler terms, Aomoji-kei is more about dressing the way you want as opposed to what society thinks looks good. It’s about moving against the mainstream trends rather than with it. People who are part of this subculture tend to switch between many styles. So girl into dolly-kei might wear fairy-kei the next day. It’s all about self-expression. It become popular in 2011 with the rise of representative model Kyary Pamyu Pamyu who made her major singing debut.

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Do Circle Lenses Make the Girl?

For a while now, I have really been wanting to get a pair of circle lenses. My friends Alex and Erika, are also interested in them. We’ve even decided on buying some together and spliting the cost. Recently more people have been wearing contact lenses, not just overseas but in Barbados. I even when into a beauty supply store recently and found a whole load of them selling. As anyone who is into Asian fashion knows, circle lenses are a staple ingredient to completing the look. It is what usually separates the ulzzang and gyaru from the average fashionable girl. In fact many celebrities in Japan and Korea wear circle lenses such as Girls Generation, Hyunah, Rola and Kyary Pamyu Pamyu.

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