Want to model in Japan? Check out the CanCam Contest
I’m late to the party but I wanted to talk about the CanCam Model Search. CanCam is a fashion magazine that I covered in my Akamoji-kei vs Aomoji-kei: It All Started with Red Letters post. It is an Akamoji-kei magazine. CanCam gets it’s name from ‘I Can Campus’, which indicates its strong college female following. However it is also known as the “Office Lady Bible”.

In an attempt to bring a larger following as well as notoriety to the magazine, the staff of CanCam has decided to do a model search. CanCam is trying to find a star that represents the new generation. It is not just an ordinary model search as it will make use of social networking site, Google+.
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Akamoji-kei vs Aomoji-kei: It all started with red letters
In my last post, introduced Aomoji and Akamoji to you. I gave a basic definition and went deeper to explore the currently popular Aomoji-kei subculture. This time, I’ll be focusing on Akamoji which has not be properly covered in my opinion. I hope by reading this, it will expand everyone’s knowledge on Japanese fashion.

Akamoji-kei (literally: Red-letter style) is a fashion subculture that is more accepted by the mainstream. Akamoji appeals to young office ladies (OL) and female college students and is characterized by its conservative style. It is often worn by women in their early 20s. It is a style that is thought to be popular with men. Despite being conservative, it’s far from being outdated and is considered elegant. The name akamoji comes from the five magazines which were first known for their red title on the cover page. However it can be said that it has been on a decline since the bubble economy burst. Nowadays it has somewhat mixed with gyaru, creating onee-kei.
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REVIEW: Eyeteck Iris Gray Circle Lenses
Hi everyone, long time no see. I updated the layout of the blog for something more versatile, inspired by Ohmylittlegirl’s layout. However I’m still tinkering with it, so expect some changes. I’ll be coming with a review today! Not just any review but one on circle lenses.
Last week, I received my first pair of circle lenses. It was Eyeteck Iris Gray 14.2mm sponsored by KPOP2.com. As it was my first pair, I was very excited to see what it would look like on me. When the package arrived, I was so happy, it came extremely fast (11 days), and in a bright pink package. I like that color so much, and it was a nice change from the usual boring brown or white packaging.

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Akamoji-kei vs Aomoji-kei: The rise of Harajuku

Today, I wanted to introduce the concept of Akamoji-kei and Aomoji-kei. Now you may ask, what the heck is that? It is a concept that not many people outside of Japan know of. Based on research and my own understanding, I hope to give you a greater understanding these concepts. This is a two-part piece so I’ll be doing the currently popular Aomoji-kei.

Aomoji-kei (literally: Blue-letter style) is a fashion subculture that is influenced by the trends in Harajuku. It is a casual yet girl fashion. However it also prides itself as being radical and creative. It is opposite to the conservative and elegant akamoji kei. As such, it appeals to women rather than men. The term was coined by Asobi System’s Yusuke Nakagawa. Rather than Shibuya which influences the notorious gyaru-kei, Aomoji-kei sticks close to Harajuku. The differences in the reader models can be seen between the two styles. Gyaru models tend to brimming with energy and always show a smiling face. While Aomoji-kei models tend to show off their duck lips and look expressionless.

So in simpler terms, Aomoji-kei is more about dressing the way you want as opposed to what society thinks looks good. It’s about moving against the mainstream trends rather than with it. People who are part of this subculture tend to switch between many styles. So girl into dolly-kei might wear fairy-kei the next day. It’s all about self-expression. It become popular in 2011 with the rise of representative model Kyary Pamyu Pamyu who made her major singing debut.

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Cosplaying and Convention Culture in the Caribbean

Hello everyone. I’m here once again to talk to you about something that relates to Japanese culture, cosplay. In recent times, elements of cosplay has been integrated into everyday dress.With anime-inspired nail art, Sailor Moon tattoos, pastel wigs and more.

Likewise, Japanese pop culture has been steadily growing in the Caribbean. The region itself has three conventions, while not as big as France’s Japan Expo, USA’s Anime Expo and Japan’s Comiket, they are notable in their own right. These conventions include Barbados’ AnimeKon, Puerto Rico’s PR Comic Con and Jamaica’s Anime Nation. Each convention puts an emphasis on mixing Japanese pop culture with local talent and each heavily features the work of local artists.

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